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Macbeth & Lady Macbeth

MACBETH

Who said these things about Macbeth, and why? It may be Macbeth himself, or another character.

ACT 1

brave Macbeth - well he deserves that name (sc. 2, l. 16)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

O valiant cousin! worthy gentleman! (sc. 2, l. 24)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

A drum! A drum!
Macbeth doth come. (sc. 3, l. 30)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

Good sir, why do you start, and seem to fear
Things that do sound so fair? (sc. 3, l. 51)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

New honours come upon him,
Like our strange garments, cleave not to their mould
But with the aid of use. (sc. 3, l. 144)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

From hence to Inverness
And bind us closer to you. (sc. 4, l. 42)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

Stars hide your fires!
Let not light see my black and dark desires. (sc. 4, l. 50)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

I do fear thy nature;
It is too full o' the milk of human kindness ... (sc. 5, l. 15)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

Look like the innocent flower
But be the serpent under it. (sc. 5, l. 63)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

I dare do all that may become a man;
Who dares do more, is none. (sc. 7, l. 46)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

ACT 2

Is this a dagger that I see before me? (sc. 1, l. 33)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

I go, and it is done; the bell invites me. (sc. 1, l. 62)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

This is a sorry sight. (sc. 2, l. 21)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

Methought I heard a voice cry 'Sleep no more!' (sc. 2, l. 35)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

A little water clears us of this deed. (sc. 2, l. 67)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

O yet I do repent me of my fury,
That I did kill them (sc. 3, l.107)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

ACT 3

Thou hast it now: King, Cawdor, GIamis, all,
As the weird women promised; and I fear,
Thou play'dst most foully for it. (sc. 1, l. 1)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

Banquo, thy soul's flight
If it find heaven, must find it out tonight (sc. 1, l. 142)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

Be innocent of the knowledge, dearest chuck
Till thou applaud the deed (sc. 2, l. 45)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

The table's full (sc. 4, l. 46)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

Thou canst not say I did it; never shake
Thy gory locks at me (sc. 4, l. 50)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

What man dare, I dare (sc. 4, l. 99)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

I pray you speak not, he grows worse and worse (sc. 4, l. 119)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

ACT 4

By the pricking of my thumbs
Something wicked this way comes (sc. 1, l. 44)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

Then live, Macduff: what need I fear of thee? (sc. 1, l. 82)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

This tyrant, whose sole name blisters our tongues,
Was once thought honest. (sc. 3, l. 12)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

ACT 5

Now does he feel
His secret murders sticking on his hands. (sc. 2, l. 16)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

I have lived long enough. (sc. 3, l. 22)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

I'll fight till from my bones my flesh be hack'd (sc. 3, l. 32)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

How does your patient, doctor? (sc. 3, l. 37)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

The queen, my lord, is dead. (sc. 5, l. 16)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

They have tied me to a stake; I cannot fly. (sc. 7, l. 1)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

Turn, hell-hound, turn! (sc. 7, l. 32)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

Lay on, Macduff,
And damn'd be him that first cries 'Hold, enough!' (sc. 7, l. 64)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

this dead butcher (sc. 7, l. 98)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

LADY MACBETH

Who said these things about lady Macbeth, and why? It may be Lady Macbeth herself, or another character.

ACT 1

My dearest partner of greatness (sc. 5, l. 10)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

Hie thee hither
That I may pour my spirits in thine ear (sc. 5, l. 24)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

Come ye spirits
That tend on mortal thoughts! Unsex me here (sc. 5, l. 39)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

Leave all the rest to me (sc. 5, l. 72)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

Give me your hand
Conduct me to mine host. (sc. 6, l. 28)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

I have given suck, and know
How tender 'tis to love the babe that milks me. (sc. 7, l. 54)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

But screw your courage to the sticking-place
And we'll not fail. (sc. 7, l. 60)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

Bring forth men-children only! (sc. 7, l. 72)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

ACT 2

That which hath made them drunk hath made me bold. (sc. 2, l. 1)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

Had he not resembled
My father as he slept, I had done it. (sc. 2, l. 14)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

A foolish thought to say a sorry sight. (sc. 2, l. 22)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

Infirm of purpose!
Give me the daggers. (sc. 2, l. 52)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

A little water clears us of this deed. (sc. 2, l. 67)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

Look to the lady. (sc. 3, l. 120)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

ACT 3

Be bright and jovial among your guests tonight. (sc. 2, l. 28)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

Why do you make such faces? When all's done
You look but on a stool. (sc. 4, l. 67)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

You lack the season of all natures, sleep. (sc. 4, l. 141)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

ACT 5

She has light by her continually; 'tis her command. (sc. 1, l. 22)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

What is it she does now? Look how she rubs her hands. (sc. 1, l. 26)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

The Thane of Fife had a wife: where is she now? (sc. 1, l. 41)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

What, will these hands ne'er be clean? (sc. 1, l. 42)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

She has spoke what she should not, I am sure of that. (sc. 1, l. 46)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

To bed, to bed, to bed. (sc. 1, l. 65)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

Not so sick, my lord,
As she is troubled with thick-coming fancies,
That keep her from her rest. (sc. 3, l. 37)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

She should have died hereafter. (sc. 5, l. 17)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

his fiend-like queen
Who, as 'tis thought, by self and violent hands
Took off her life - (sc. 7, l. 98)

who: ________________

why: ____________________________________________________________

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